Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Brislington House, insane asylum, BS4

Via Flickr:
Edward Long Fox (1762–1835) born 26.4.1762, Falmouth, Cornwall. Married Catherine Brown in 1784. Then Isabella Ker in 1805. He died 2.5.1835 Brislington.

He was a British psychiatrist. He established an insane asylum at Brislington House, near Bristol, Somerset, and classified the patients according to social class as well as behavioural presentation.

He was a member of the Fox family of Falmouth, one of the 11 children of Joseph Fox (1729–1784) and Elizabeth Hingston, his wife.

In the 19th century, Brislington became particularly well known for two buildings. Brislington House, believed to be the first purpose-built mental asylum for the humane treatment of the insane, was built by Cornish Quaker Dr Edward Long Fox, and opened in 1804.

"Dr Fox's" as it became known, continued to be run by the Fox family, who became great benefactors in the village, for nearly 150 years until it closed in 1952.

In 2001 it was developed into luxury flats and renamed Long Fox Manor.

Originally designed as a group of detached houses where patients with different types of mental illness could be separately accommodated, the buildings were later joined together. Some detached houses on the estate were used for "members of the nobility". Staircases, doors, joists and window frames were all constructed of iron to minimise the risk of fire.

It was converted into flats in 2001. The grounds are a good example of a purpose- built landscape which was designed to aid the healing of damaged minds.

Some detached houses on the estate were used for "members of the nobility". Staircases, doors, joists and window frames were all constructed of iron to minimise the risk of fire.

See photo image

www.flickr.com/photos/archidave/1309986808/